Gustave Baumann

Gustave Baumann (1881-1971) is known as a leading figure in the color woodcut revival in America. Born in Germany, he moved to America with his family in 1891. He received his art education from the Art Institute of Chicago, and returned to Germany to study wood carving and wood block printing techniques. Baumann came back to the United States to earn a living as a graphic artist, eventually moving to New Mexico in 1918, settling in Santa Fe where he lived the rest of his life. In Santa Fe, Baumann befriended many local artists and took part in various community celebrations. He made the head of the first Zozobra and carved and performed with marionettes. He was a member of the Society of American Graphic Artists and the Taos Society of Artists. He is also recognized for his role in the 1930s as an area coordinator of the Public Works of Art Project, a New Deal program to employ artists. His prints are in many major collections including: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Public Library, Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts-Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe.

















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